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  • Diseases relevant to the health of domestic pets and people.

    Despite this, there is scant evidence that foxes are actually an important source of infection.

    Instead, domestic pets and particularly dogs, which are susceptible to a similar range of diseases as foxes, are probably a much more important source of infection for humans.


    Foxes are susceptible to sarcoptic mange. This is a skin condition caused by a mite resulting in extensive hair loss and it can be fatal.

    It is highly contagious among foxes, and can be passed to domestic pets such as dogs and cats, especially if they use the same areas as foxes such as holes through fences and hedges.


    Foxes carry a number of internal parasites. For people, the most important are probably the roundworm Toxocara canis and tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus which causes hydatid disease (the formation of fluid-filled in cysts in organs such as the liver).

    These parasites also occur in dogs and are transferred between hosts through the ingestion of worm eggs passed in the droppings of an infected animal.


    Foxes are also susceptible to Weil's disease (Leptospirosis), which can be passed on to other animals and humans through contact with their urine.

    Distemper has not been recorded in wild foxes in the UK.


    Britain is currently rabies-free, but in countries where rabies occurs, foxes can contract and pass on the disease.

    Read more ›

    Diseases relevant to the health of domestic pets and people.

    Despite this, there is scant evidence that foxes are actually an important source of infection.

    Instead, domestic pets and particularly dogs, which are susceptible to a similar range of diseases as foxes, are probably a much more important source of infection for humans.


    Foxes are susceptible to sarcoptic mange. This is a skin condition caused by a mite resulting in extensive hair loss and it can be fatal.

    It is highly contagious among foxes, and can be passed to domestic pets such as dogs and cats, especially if they use the same areas as foxes such as holes through fences and hedges.


    Foxes carry a number of internal parasites. For people, the most important are probably the roundworm Toxocara canis and tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus which causes hydatid disease (the formation of fluid-filled in cysts in organs such as the liver).

    These parasites also occur in dogs and are transferred between hosts through the ingestion of worm eggs passed in the droppings of an infected animal.


    Foxes are also susceptible to Weil's disease (Leptospirosis), which can be passed on to other animals and humans through contact with their urine.

    Distemper has not been recorded in wild foxes in the UK..


    Britain is currently rabies-free, but in countries where rabies occurs, foxes can contract and pass on the disease.

    Read more ›

    Pest - Go Limited provide professional services across London, Hertfordshire & Essex.

    • Enfield
    • Haringey
    • Epping Forest
    • Redbridge
    • Newham
    • Tower Hamlets
    • Barking & Dagenham
    • Havering
    • Hackney
    • Islington
    • Chelsea & Westminster
    • Camden
    • Barnet
    • Greenwich
    • Southwark
    • Lewisham

    If your area is not listed above; please call us as we will be able to put you in contact with another approved specialist in your area.

    Read more ›

    Diseases relevant to the health of domestic pets and people.

    Despite this, there is scant evidence that foxes are actually an important source of infection.

    Instead, domestic pets and particularly dogs, which are susceptible to a similar range of diseases as foxes, are probably a much more important source of infection for humans.


    Foxes are susceptible to sarcoptic mange. This is a skin condition caused by a mite resulting in extensive hair loss and it can be fatal.

    It is highly contagious among foxes, and can be passed to domestic pets such as dogs and cats, especially if they use the same areas as foxes such as holes through fences and hedges.


    Foxes carry a number of internal parasites. For people, the most important are probably the roundworm Toxocara canis and tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus which causes hydatid disease (the formation of fluid-filled in cysts in organs such as the liver).

    These parasites also occur in dogs and are transferred between hosts through the ingestion of worm eggs passed in the droppings of an infected animal.


    Foxes are also susceptible to Weil's disease (Leptospirosis), which can be passed on to other animals and humans through contact with their urine.

    Distemper has not been recorded in wild foxes in the UK.


    Britain is currently rabies-free, but in countries where rabies occurs, foxes can contract and pass on the disease.

    Read more ›